How One LACT Unit on One Pad Can Handle Up to 6 Wells without Contamination

Our parent company, DXP, recently published an article about Lease Automatic Custody Transfer (LACT) units and how their systems can help reduce customer costs when it comes to running and maintaining them.

Most LACT units pump oil from a storage tank. It runs through a charge pump and then passes through a BS&W (Basic Sediment & Water) Monitor. The oil then moves into an air eliminator, which eliminates any air and gasses that may be trapped in the stream of oil. Lastly, the oil travels into the static mixer and is mixed before the small sample gets released into a sample container for further inspection.

A lot happens based on the oil’s BS&W measurements. If low percentages of sediment and water are detected, the good oil is diverted through the Coriolis meter. If the amounts are too high, it is sent into a bad oil tank. The Coriolis meter measures within 0.02% of accuracy to satisfy custody transfer requirements.

Once the entire LACT process is completed, the good oil can be pumped into pipelines or loaded into trucks for distribution.

Another important component of the LACT process is the PLC (Programmable Logic Controller). With the right computer systems in place, much of the oil processing can be automated. Specs can be preset and followed within the different LACT unit phases. Likewise, the health of your equipment is easy to monitor, which saves time and money on maintenance and repairs.

DXP has shown that with the right systems and equipment in place, it is possible to manage up to six oil well streams with one LACT unit. Additional wells can be drilled on the same pad and exiting tank levels can be monitored from a central control panel. You’re able to switch between tanks automatically and make sure all the data stays uncontaminated throughout the process.

For more information about LACT units and oil processing, contact Cortech Engineering. We have the knowledge and expertise to help you get the best possible results.